Thai Burma Project

Medic Training for Jungle Clinics

Since 2011, Global Angels has funded 56 students to undergo their first, second and third year medic training to help staff the 32 mobile health clinics serving 125,000 people in the region.


Screen-Shot-2013-12-20-at-13.14.23Doctors, Nurses and Dentists Training Medics
Since 2011, Global Angels has has been funding 56 Karen students to undergo their first, second and third year medic training to help staff the 32 mobile health clinics serving 125,000 people in the region. In 2014, we are hoping to fund a 20 week full board training course for 25 more students. It currently costs £500 per student for the training.

Responding to the overwhelming need, Dr Stephen Nash has been taking volunteer training teams of doctors, nurses and dentists into the jungle since he visited Burma in 2002, believing that the best way to tackle the extreme lack of medical care was to train local recruits as medics. A growing number of skilled volunteers from the UK have given up their time over the last 8 years to train medics, dentists and midwives in order to relieve suffering and care for these vulnerable people in isolated and high-risk areas.

“Teaching going very well so far, the students are wonderful – bright and enthusiastic. Their thirst for knowledge really is amazing! Thank you very much for asking me to do this, it really has been great. One of the most rewarding things I’ve ever done.” Dr Tanya Hall, UK

“In the last 3 years the medic training has moved to a new level altogether. It is wonderful to be in a place where we are training medics who can deliver basic community health care but also give lifesaving treatment for malaria, dehydration, pneumonia and TB.” Dr Steff Nash, Chief Executive Officer (partner on the ground).

Funding Mobile Health Clinics
We fully fund two of these mobile clinics operating in an area where there are no hospitals or basic infrastructure. The clinics are located in Karen State, one in north in Thaton District, and the other in the south in Dooplaya District.

The trained medics provide health campaigns, reproductive health services, regular school-based care, and response to emergencies such as obstructed labour. In some cases they may carry out amputations for landmine victims and most also have a dental service. The health care workers in the villages also identify and treat illness and and provide simple things such as mosquito nets to try and prevent the spread of malaria.

The 2 clinics have now seen the rate of malaria decrease from 25% to under 3%.




 

What we are doing right now


 


Please help us continue to train a further 25 medics and fund the mobile health clinics.

 
CLICK HERE TO DONATE NOW

To find out more about Gift Aid and whether you are eligible for it, please click here